TELEMANN: ESSERCIZII MUSIC (MUSICAL DIVERSIONS), Vol. 1 - The Aulos Ensemble

TELEMANN: ESSERCIZII MUSIC (MUSICAL DIVERSIONS), Vol. 1 - The Aulos Ensemble

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EXPLORING MUSIC: Exploring Music:  Never Better Performed-- Telemann's Essercizii Musici  

Exploring Music:  Never Better Performed-- Telemann's Essercizii Musici by David M. Greene

I have read, with some amusement, the Papierkrieg over the "Vivaldi glut" in the Letters column of this organ (well, harmonium at least). Is it just me (as resident exsanguine turnip), or isn't there also a Telemann glut? Considering that he holds the Guinness record for musical prolificity, there's certain grave danger of one.


As with Vivaldi, it was not always so, and many a man is now alive who can remember when Telemann records were harder to come by than the sunken treasures of the Titanic. The second edition of The Gramophone Encyclopedia of Recorded Music (1942), for example, lists the A minor Suite, two quartets, a trio sonata, two movements from the Tafelmusik, three songs, six keyboard fantasias, a single fantasia, and an unidentified aria. Schwann now lists several columns of LPs and CDs, any one of which probably contains as much music as what I have cataloged above.


I believe that there is an inherent danger in extraordinary artistic fertility: it makes one suspect of glibness and lack of seriousness of intent. Though his contemporaries considered Telemann up there with the best of them, later generations tax­ed him with just such sins. Just for the heck of it, I attempted a very unscientific run­down on how long such attitudes lasted. I began with two older histories, one general (Lang) and one of the period (Bukofzer). Neither gave Telemann much individual attention, being content to cite him as an also-ran with those typical of his time.



Deems Taylor's updating of The Music Lover's Encyclopedia (1939) accords Telemann eight lines which call him "prolific and facile." (Bach gets three-and-a-half pages plus a family tree; Handel gets three­and-a-half columns.) The American History and Encyclopedia of Music (1908), however, gets down to business. Acknowledging Telemann's technical knowledge, it continues " ... but his works are lacking in depth and grandeur, and his church pieces particularly seem shallow. He had a bad influence on the church music of his day .... He seems to have been affected by Italian composition, then decadent .... His writings are lacking in depth and originality." This view was echoed and embroidered as recently as 1954 by Grove V: "With all of his undoubted ability, he originated nothing, but was content to follow the tracks laid down by the old contrapuntal school of organists, whose ideas and forms he adopted without change." His fertility, contrapuntal skill, and technical mastery "were neutralized by his lack of any earnest Ideal and by a fatal facility naturally inclined to superficiality... The shallowness of the church music of the latter half of the l8th century Is distinctly traceable to Telemann's influence "


But, taking a forward leap of only 30 years to the Britannica, we find Telemann enshrined In Its "Macropedia" (reserved for the most important entries). Here we are told that, thanks largely to Max Schneider and Romain Rolland, the official view of the composer has been upgraded, and we are given such judgments as this: "He composed equally well for the church as for opera and concerts. His music was natural in melody, bold in harmonies, buoyant in rhythm, and beautifully instrumentated. Profound or witty, serious or light, It never lacked quality or variety."


And in his too-brief notes to this album, Richard Taruskln sums up Telemann's galanterie, that "quality of civility and wit, grace and everyday congeniality that was worlds away from the passionate heroics of the baroque ... Telemann wore his learning lightly, occasionally affected a pleas­ing melancholy but never (at least in a chamber piece) went after deep pathos, would count himself successful if his hearers smiled and said 'How pretty.' "

 

OUR REVIEW

TRACK LISTING

THE AULOS ENSEMBLE

Anne Briggs, flauto-traverso
Linda Quan, Baroque violin
Myron Lutzke, Baroque violincello
Marc Schachman, Baroque oboe
Charles Sherman, Harpsichord
Richard Taruskin, Viola da gamba

Trio Sonata for Oboe, Violin and Basso Continuo, TWV 42.g5

I. Mesto 02:37
II. Allegro 03:19
III. Andante - Largo - Andante 03:47
IV. Vivace 01:59

 

Viola da Gamba Sonata in A Minor, TWV 41.a6

I. Largo 03:18
II. Allegro 01:40
III. Soave 02:18
IV. Allegro 02:30

 

Trio Sonata for Flute, Viola da Gamba and Basso Continuo, TWV 42.h4

I. Largo 01:45
II. Vivace 01:39
III. Dolce 01:33
IV. Vivace 01:57

 

Violin Sonata in F Major, TWV 41.F4

I. Andante 02:11
II. Allegro 02:12
III. Siciliana 02:16
IV. Allegro 04:05

 

Oboe Sonata in E Minor, TWV 41.e6

I. Largo 02:28
II. Allegro 01:58
III. Grave 01:33
IV. Vivace 01:39

 

Trio Sonata for Flute, Oboe and Basso Continuo in D Minor, TWV 42.d4

I. Largo 02:02
II. Allegro 02:01
III. Affetuoso 02:22
IV. Presto 01:46

 

Harpsichord Suite in C Major, TWV 32.3

I. Largo 02:55
II. Allemanda 03:40
III. Luna 01:58
IV. Corrente 03:07
V. Minuet I - Minuet II 03:11
VI. Giga 02:50

 

Trio Sonata for Violin, Viola da Gamba and Basso Continuo in D Major, TWV 42.D9

I. Dolce 03:39
II. Presto 01:25
III. Pastorale 01:47
IV. Vivace 02:11

 

Flute Sonata in G Major, TWV 41.G9

I. Cantabile 01:26
II. Allegro 02:03
III. Affettuoso 01:32
IV. Allegro 01:48

 

Cello Sonata in D Major, from Der getreue Music-Meister, TWV 41.D6

I. Lento 01:49
II. Allegro 02:46
III. Largo 01:36
IV. Allegro 01:59

 

ROMAN TOTENBERG: THE COMPLETE MUSICAL HERITAGE SOCIETY RECORDINGS

ROMAN TOTENBERG: THE COMPLETE MUSICAL HERITAGE SOCIETY RECORDINGS

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Roman Totenberg was a Polish-American violinist and educator  who made three recordings for Musical Heritage Society. 

 

This collection celebrates their return after being unavailable for 40 years, and represents the first time they have all been available in one set.

EXPLORING MUSIC: LESSONS FROM MY FATHER by Nina Totenberg

LESSONS FROM MY FATHER by Nina Totenberg

My father started teaching when he was 11 years old. His first student was 9. Ever since, he has loved it and learned from it. He once told me that you have to figure out how you do something in order to teach it to someone else. And if your system doesn't work for that someone else, you have to adapt it until it does. Sometimes that means re-fingering an entire concerto for a student to suit that person's physical and technical capabilities. But my father is more than a violin teacher. He is a financial advisor and consultant. He helps round up scholarship money and finds jobs for his students. He is also a Realtor. He helps them find apartments or live-in situations they can afford. And he is a travel agent, and mother. 

 

A few years ago, when I was visiting, he asked me to drive with him and a student to Boston's North Station. When we got there, I realized why. He needed me to car-sit so he could take the student to the train. She didn't speak much English, and he was afraid she would get lost. When he got back to the car, I asked what took so long. "Oh," he said, "I had to get her some sandwiches for the train. It's a long ride to New York, you know." If you look at the orchestras in the United States, and much of the world today, you would be hard-pressed to find one without a Roman Totenberg student. About six years ago, I was with my father in Prague at a concert of the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra. After the concert, we went backstage to say hello to maestro James Levine. Suddenly, I hear a scream: "Mr. Totenberg!" and this cute violinist comes running into his arms. It's a scene I have witnessed many times. As my sister Jill said, in a rap song she composed for my father's 90th birthday, what we tell women from 8 to 80 is: "Get in line, get in line, you're number five thousand nine hundred and ninety-nine." 

 

For students who study with Mr. Totenberg today, it's hard to imagine how much musical history he has been a part of. Name a modern composer — Barber, Stravinsky, Copland, Szymanowski, Hindemith, Martinu, Milhaud — he knew them all, worked with them, and even premiered some of their works. The same is true for the great musicians and conductors, from Fritz Kreisler and Artur Rubinstein to Leopold Stokowski and Pierre Monteux.

 

When I go into my father's study and look at his hundreds of records and reviews and prizes, it is hard to absorb his incredible life — from famines and revolutions in Russia to the life of a child prodigy, winning the Mendelssohn prize in Berlin at age 18, playing for European kings and American presidents. Just looking at his recordings is like time traveling through the 20th century. From the thick, waxen records he made in the 1920s to the 78s of the following era, then 33s and then CDs. 

 

I look at the reviews from his youth, and I gasp and giggle. One reviewer wrote in the early 1930s: "He is a thorough technician, prepared to take up the sword with anyone... He is not the Slavic type, who breaks the strings as an outlet for his feelings; he is a wise man who knows where the limit lies, even when the tempo demands blazing fire." Of his New York debut, composer and critic Virgil Thompson wrote: "Totenberg can play anything his predecessors could. He is, in fact, more expert than most of them. His is the smoothest bow arm of all and, in consequence, the most evenly sustained legato line." Nearly six decades later, in 2001, Richard Dyer would review a Totenberg concert in The Boston Globe with this observation: "Totenberg's playing was miraculous... He has kept growing in experience and insight." 

 

To this day, my father is still curious about everything, and never content to practice the pieces he already knows. He is always trying to learn something new, a fearless explorer of everything. His daughters have small fits about this. At the last big recital he gave, several years ago, the entire first half was new material he had learned for the program. We came home from that concert with armloads of flowers and basking in the glow of stomping, standing ovations. "Well," said Mr. T., with a twinkle in his eye, "you know, when you are very young and can do it, they scream and yell, and when you are very old and can do it, they scream and yell." "I," he said puckishly, "have been the beneficiary at both ends."

OUR REVIEW

These recordings come with a bit of mystery - the mystery to this listener is how did so much time pass before MHS could get their act together to reissue these recordings.

 

In a strictly commercial sense, this is perhaps simple to understand. MHS has recorded Oscar Shumsky performing the Bach solo Sonatas & Partitas at about the same time, and licenses were created for other performances. And that would be the "main attraction" of this set, and Totenberg's recorded output for MHS.

 

But still...to listen to Totenberg's technique and remarkable interpretive gifts...twas a crime, but luckily now, justice has been served. And the revival of Totenberg's Bach recording is a cause for celebration - his calm, sophisticated approach and his steady understanding of these works are truly to be admired.

 

A cynical ear could say Schumann's violin sonatas are justly kept underwraps. True, the original notes do note that Schumann's work for violin and piano hold little to excite the modern soloist. But for two fine "musicians' musicians" like Balsam and Totenberg, this music comes off quite well.

 

At the time of recording, the German Baroque violin concertos presented here were less understood than many modern works that Totenberg premiered. The notes refer to the practice, supposedly revived in the studio, that the soloists (violin and harpsichord) would be called on to improvise. The note writer begs our forgiveness, asking us to rely on the good taste of the performers to carry us through. Now, these ears didn't hear much in the way of wild improvisation - in fact, one does have to forgive a bit on the dated approach, particularly from the orchestra. But Totenberg, like with his Bach, plays with a romantic heart that makes a VERY persuasive argument that authenticity is not solely in the classroom. These thoughtful, heartfelt performances do make an argument that is well worth hearing.

TRACK LISTING

JOHANN SEBASTIAN BACH

Violin Sonata No. 1 in G Minor, BWV 1001

I. Adagio - Fuga 11:36
II. Siciliana 03:41
III. Presto 04:16


Violin Partita No. 1 in B Minor, BWV 1002

I. Allemande 10:58
II. Courante 07:38
III. Sarabande 06:28
IV. Tempo di Bourrée 08:49


Violin Sonata No. 2 in A Minor, BWV 1003

I. Grave - Fuga 13:58
II. Andante 06:37
III. Allegro 06:18


Violin Partita No. 2 In D Minor, BWV 1004

I. Allemande 05:03
II. Courante 02:56
III. Sarabande 04:45
IV. Gigue 04:25
V. Chaconne 16:24


Violin Sonata No. 3 in C Major, BWV 1005

I. Adagio - Fuga 17:49
II. Largo 03:24
III. Allegro assai 05:37


Violin Partita No. 3 in E Major, BWV 1006

I. Preludio 04:04
II. Louré 05:42
III. Gavotte en Rondeau 03:37
IV. Menuet I 02:24
V. Menuet II 02:19
VI. Bourrée 01:33
VII. Gigue 01:59

ROBERT SCHUMANN

Violin Sonata No. 1 in A Minor, Op. 105

I. Mit leidenschaftlichem Ausdruck 08:48
II. Allegretto 04:18
III. Lebhaft 05:16


Violin Sonata No. 2 in D Minor, Op. 121

I. Ziemlich langsam - Lebhaft 11:31
II. Sehr lebhaft 04:22
III. Leise, einfach 06:24
IV. Bewegt 07:15

with Artur Balsam, piano

 

HEINICHEN: Violin Concerto in D Major, S. 224

I. Allegro 02:46
II. Affettuoso 02:40
III. Presto 01:55


PISENDEL: Violin Concerto in G Minor, JunP I.1

I. Largo e staccato - Allegro 06:59
II. Largo  04:45
III. Allegro 05:03


HANDEL: Violin Concerto in B-Flat Major, HWV 288

I. Andante 03:28
II. Adagio 03:36
III. Allegro 03:59


FASCH: Violin Concerto in D Major, FWV L.D2

I. Allegro  03:30
II. Largo 02:36
III. Allegro

 

SOUND SAMPLES

Trio Sonata for Recorder, Oboe and Basso Continuo, TWV 42.c2 I. Largo

Violin Sonata in A Major, TWV 41.A6, I. Dolce

LINER NOTES

BACH, J.S.: 8 SONATAS FOR DIVERSE INSTRUMENTS - The Aulos Ensemble

BACH, J.S.: 8 SONATAS FOR DIVERSE INSTRUMENTS - The Aulos Ensemble

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